Flowering Dogwood

Flowering Dogwood

A couple of years ago my family visited the Asheville area in North Carolina.  We left wintry, grey Illinois and arrived in a land of flowers and birdsong.  I was smitten!  We loved it so much there that we’re planning to visit again in March.  As we drove I noticed some striking trees blooming along the highway.  They turned out to be Cornus florida, or Flowering Dogwood.  They have a striking presence, holding their large flowers on horizontal branches stacked up in layers.

37 Comments

  1. We offer you an anticipatory welcome back to the South. Good to hear you’re planning a respite from the cold and will be heading to North Carolina in March.

    Flowering dogwood is native as far southwest as eastern Texas, where we saw some great specimens during a spring visit there a decade ago.

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  2. Your painting is lovely! I love Dogwoods and wanted to plant one in the front yard of our new house, but I don’t think it does very well here. None of the nurseries had them and advised against it.
    I get my Dogwood fix by visiting Yosemite NP when they’re in bloom.

    I hope you have a lovely Spring visit in NC!

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  3. This is a very welcome painting to see in January – I love dogwoods. I don’t know if it’s the same type, but they are in some of the woods in the Finger Lakes, and I really like ’em. Do you not sign your last name on your paintings? I never noticed before.

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    1. I am amazed to learn that they are up in the Finger Lakes region, but then my neighbor has one that is thriving. They have a much larger range than I thought. I agree, we could use a touch of spring about now, couldn’t we?
      I stopped signing my last name some time ago for complicated reasons, and now find myself in the company of Cher and Collette!

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  4. The painted petals have the flowing ridges I remember from dogwood flowers. Nice bright whites, too. I have two dogwood trees in my yard, it’s a tree I’ve loved since I lived in Virginia, where it’s native. I’ve never been to Asheville, and I’d love to, for nature and the music. Have great time when you go.

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  5. A favorite tree for sure. We’ve seen quite a few in bloom up in the Cascades. The days are finally getting a bit longer. There’s hope for a end to winter yet!

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    1. I had no idea they grew there! As for winter, all I can say is hmph. We were skating along in the 40’s, no snow, just minding our business, all the way through Dec and early Jan. Now? It seems Illinois remembered what it likes to do this time of year and is throwing everything at us.

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  6. This is gorgeous but then I adore dogwoods. They are grown in Britain for the vibrant coloured branches – some are bright red in winter and add spectacular colour in a drab season. These flowers are beautiful and I can understand you wanting to make a return visit.

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    1. I do too. I also grow the red-twig dogwood. As you say, it provides a lovely red in winter and gives me a good screen all year. When I want more I simply thrust a twig into the ground and within weeks a new shrub is growing. I think that is so cool!

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  7. These are beautiful blooms, Melissa. We have two flowering dogwoods in our front yard…one white and one pink. I like that you included the always there brown tips and the ripples. They are something most people don’t see unless they look closely.

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  8. I’ve only seen dogwoods blooming in Mississippi — at least, that I’m certain of. I think I’ve seen them along some Texas roads, but since they’re understory trees and were back from the highway, I couldn’t be sure. They certainly are beautiful, and your painting evokes memories of the ones I saw in Mississippi. The azaleas were in bloom then, too, and the combination was luscious. Unfortunately, the combination of heat and wet soils makes growing them in my area an iffy proposition — but enjoying paintings of them isn’t hard at all!

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  9. One of my favorite trees! At my parents house, there was one right outside the kitchen door. But they don’t seem to grow well in Chicago, at least that’s my experience.

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    1. I couldn’t get one to grow, that’s for sure, and I almost never see one in anyone’s garden although that may just be down to people not being familiar with it. My neighbor has one. His is in full sun and seems healthy enough but doesn’t get very big.

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